The shed that ate the world

The plan to move into David’s house, which is half the size of mine, prompted finishing the basement and building a shed to help contain all our stuff. (I’m also downsizing my belongings… anyone want some stuff?) After considering a kit shed, David’s contractor pal Jim said he’d help, and they thought building from scratch would be better. I agreed to fund the project.

Multiple pickup loads later, we had a whole lot of building materials in the back yard and the shop. The allotted space was for a 12×7 shed, which seemed very reasonable. I even saw the platform. But then… it got taller.

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All we can do is laugh at this thing. It’s basically as tall as the house. Another contractor friend stopped by and just laughed too when he saw it. As long as the neighbors don’t stop talking to us we should be fine, but I know they’ll be talking about us (or rather about THE TALLEST SHED EVER). David said this morning after seeing it again it was like drunk-dialing a girl you met at a bar and then thinking the next morning, “What was I thinking?”

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Please submit ideas for landscaping this monstrosity! I’m thinking archery targets on the side, but perhaps just some corn growing in front would disguise the big brown walls. Mural?

Meanwhile the basement framing is mostly done. If we just had the cash we could get the drywall up!

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6 thoughts on “The shed that ate the world

  1. How about a quilt hung on the side for a homey touch? Suggested patterns may be: “Drunkard’s Path”, “Rob Peter to Pay Paul”, “Wild Goose Chase”, or “Rocky Road to Nowhere”.

  2. Mom left a comment! She’s really electronically savvy now!

    We could paint a quilt pattern… that might make David move out, but then I’d have more room!

  3. I think you should just attach it to the house and call it a bonus room. Think of the resale!

    Or call it a carriage house? Hang a little brass sign identifying it as a historic landmark, and scatter some old horse gear around to make it look authentic? Everybody’s a sucker for landmark status. Again, think of the resale value…

  4. Yes, I was thinking of selling tickets, calling it an Irvington Oddity. We’d have to put up a cupola and cover it in pop tabs or something to draw the right crowds. Maybe we could paint a message on the roof and get famous on Google Earth!

    It would make a great master closet if we just connected that couple of feet to the house…

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